How VideowindoW Turns Airport Lounge Windows Into Digital Signage Displays

The 16:9 PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY SCREENFEED – DIGITAL SIGNAGE CONTENT

The digital signage industry has seen through its history a number of stabs at using window glass as a display surface – using films and projectors, LED overlays and even high-bright screens facing out from inside.

A Dutch startup called VideowindoW is going at the challenge very differently – with switchable glass window panes that can be dimmed to control daylight glare, but also run graphics and full-motion video on them.

The main target application is curtain wall glass windows in airports and other mass transportation venues. The switchable glass adjusts based on lighting conditions, but the windows can also do things like run airport messaging, show advertising or even, via a smartphone app, allow people in a departure lounge to play old-school arcade games like Pong.

VideowindoW is mainly a software company, but putting this all together requires the people and partnerships to handle everything from window manufacturing to LCD glass design. The company is still very much a bootstrapped startup, but it has a pair of operating installations in Rotterdam’s airport, which is just up the road from the company’s offices.

The pandemic has thrown some growth plans off, as airports were largely empty for months, but co-founder and CEO Remco Veenbrink says they’ve been generating interest from airports and other  kinds of venues all over the world.

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TRANSCRIPT

Remco, thanks for joining me. Can you give me a rundown on what Video Window is all about? 

Remco Veenbrink: Yeah. Thank you for having me, David. Video Window is a glare controlled with a media platform. You can compare us to segmented tintable glass, which doesn’t exist. So it’s tintable glass with segmentation and those segments work like addressable pixels and with those pixels, we control the transparency of the window. But as we show content, we can actually show interesting videos, graphic art as glare control. So our system controls the transparency of the content, and we’re developing all kinds of nice content for Video Window to work like glare control.

So you can think of gamification. We already had Pong. We’re now working on Space Invaders which can be controlled by passengers because our main target area sector is aviation right now in any public transportation hub. Based on QR codes, people can then grab their controller and play Space Invaders, but it is glare-controlled, and we also have generative video art. It’s all glare control. 

So it’s smart building glass that doubles as video walls. This would be a quick way of saying it? 

Remco Veenbrink: If you change the word “wall” for “window”, then yeah.

It works like a video wall, but it’s transparent and that way we don’t need to be in front of a wall, we can be embedded into the glass, and we actually serve people, the planet, and profit. We can also reduce the CO2 emissions of a building and help in reducing the carbon footprint of that building. So there’s the tintable glass aspect.

So what’s the underlying technology. Is it switchable glass stuff or is it LED embedded in glass? 

Remco Veenbrink: It’s liquid crystal. That’s the core, it’s a thin-film transistor liquid crystal display. So it’s TFT. We started out with a twisted nematic, so TN LCD, and we recently developed a high-resolution display based on TFT. 

So when you say high resolution, for a typical structural glass panel that you’re using would you be realizing full HD resolution or 4K, or how does all that work? 

Remco Veenbrink: It’s 2K resolution right now, and we’re happy to work together with an OEM who can actually build that for us, because before we had a 15 millimeter, like half an inch sized pixel that was a rather big pixel, but this new generation of Video Windows is built together with an OEM. 

Okay. So you’re – I don’t want to say approximating, it’s the wrong word – but the visual experience is not that much different from what you would see on a conventional LCD display then, in terms of resolution? 

Remco Veenbrink: Nope. It’s a 2K square pixel resolution. So that’s a bit different from a normal LCD display. They are subdivided into subpixels. So you have RGB sub-pixels, and we don’t have those. We have square pixels, it’s a monochrome pixel. 

Is there any opportunity to go to RGB or is it always just the way you do it and it makes the most sense to be monochrome? 

Remco Veenbrink: RGB subpixels take away so much transparency that you need a backlight, and as we use the exterior light, the sunlight, the daylight as our backlight. So we wanted to make it as transparent as possible, and with RGB subpixels it’s dark. It’s pretty dark.

With LCD technology, I don’t think we will get an RGB transparent screen that could work as glare control the way we use it. We’ve seen some interesting developments with the electoral wedding which was done by a Dutch professor. He came by, he showed the technique, but that’s years out before that will be available.

That’s a very fundamental technology that’s still under development and that’s a CMYK solution, and that means as there is no black in there it’s pretty watercolorly still but it’s an interesting technique. I don’t think that with TFT LCD, we will ever see an RGB transparent display that can be used in the way that we do.

So using the natural sunlight as a rear illumination of the display, so to speak, what happens at night? 

Remco Veenbrink: Then our backlight is gone. Predominantly, we’re glare control so we embrace the sun. We embrace the daylight, instead of fighting it, whereas video walls would actually increase the lumen output and really put more nits in there. We actually have a higher contrast ratio when there’s more sun. On the new panel, we’re testing it and averaging it out but it’s around 8 Watts per square meter, and we average this out because usually, you don’t show a full black as an image. So when we put it as a full black image, it’s around 8 Watts per square meter, and that’s so little especially if you compare that to those high brightness screens, they become more efficient over time but that’s 800 Watts easily per square meter.

So if you address the areas that we aim for 100-400 square meters, you’re looking at some serious energy consumption, and yeah, for us the 200 square meters you could still run that on a normal outlet. It’s very energy efficient.

So if I’m sitting in a departure lounge at the airport in Rotterdam, what am I seeing on this window glass? What’s showing, and how does it look? 

Remco Veenbrink: Right now, we have content agreements with the local museum, with a local art Academy and they all provide content for us. So it’s a lot of cultures, it’s a lot of art. We also have poets that provide work. So we have poetry that shows, we make that with the motion graphics into an interesting film and we have a Pong playing, so you can log in with your phone and play pong and that’s all in a mix. So we have five-minute mixes. So we show commercial content, we show artistic content and we show gamification, and yeah that’s how we add value, and next to that, we also have a close connection to the internal communication department from the airport who uses our screen to address certain messages to passengers, for instance, all the COVID measures, we run that. In every other film, we show those measures that people should take into account. 

And you show operational stuff as well, like “You’re at Gate 5 and this is a flight to..”, that sort of stuff? 

Remco Veenbrink: Yeah, that’s the new stuff but we haven’t installed our new high-resolution screen yet. In two months, it will be installed, and there we can show flight information and wayfinding because that is too detailed for pixels with a 15-millimeter size, and even though we have a 25 square meter set up, you can only show one flight at a time and people like to have an overview. But that’s definitely coming and that’s what we’re building right now, is the API integration to have that flight information shown on our hardware. 

And you mentioned you’re primarily focused on mass transport, particularly airports. Why are they interested in your product?

Remco Veenbrink: Good point. Their main issue right now is non-aviation revenue, making more cash flow. So they need more money, and we can help them with increasing their non-aviation revenue by showing commercial content. So we have a threefold advantage. We have ad experience cause we’re mostly at addressing the gate areas.

So we can add more experience for the passengers by showing artistic content, gamification, and interactive content. We can actually reduce the CO2 emission by helping the climate control system and by being more transparent which allows for daylight to be a bigger part of the basic illumination of that area. So we can help save energy, and then with the commercial content, we can help add non-aviation revenue so that we are addressing their biggest pain, that profit part. But, they all have to also live up to their goals, which is reduced CO2. 

When it comes to the media side of things on monetizing these window displays, do you get pushback because A) it’s only in black and white, and B) it’s only running during daylight hours.

Remco Veenbrink: The daylight hours, we can address. It’s all proven technology. It’s just not so sustainable and we really like the sustainable aspect of our proposition. The color, I tried to explain to them that if you have an 85-inch commercial content full-color all over the place anyway, do you really want a 100 square meter display to be full-color? Your entire terminal will be blended or washed away in all kinds of colors. 

Color is very intrusive apart from it being actively lit or, 

The fact that it’s black and white allows for such a big screen to be part of your building. So it integrates really nicely and even has a soothing effect with our generative video content. We show biophilic design, so we show leaves and flowers and we imitate the canopy of a dense forest where sunlight is broken up, and we create a very nice shadow pattern, which is moving, which is very soothing and that shimmering light really is calming downthe passengers. 

This is an added value that really doesn’t need color. But there’s a lot of communication that we can do with being monochrome and a lot of premium advertising is still done in black and white by choice because it just has a more premium feel to it.

Do airports typically use a tintable electronic glass of some kind, or is this new to them, regardless of whether it has the media capability that yours has? 

Remco Veenbrink: Tentacle glass is being implemented, I’ve seen it in a couple of American airports. That’s done by either Sage or View, those are two big players. One is American, the other is French. 

Tintable glass is a good solution. It’s just that it’s pretty expensive, right? Your return on investment is taking pretty long. So with our solution, our segmented tintable glass pays for itself immediately because we offer it in a leasing option, so the costs for leasing are way below the profits for advertising. So actually we don’t ask people if they want to buy our stuff, we ask them how much money they can make from their glass. 

So you work with some sort of a leasing company and if an airport comes to you, you are able to set something up for them?

Remco Veenbrink: Yeah, that’s how we do it. We work with the Global Leasing Company, or at least in the States, that’s how we do it. So we reach out to them. We have a potential client in Luxembourg, for instance, how can you finance that, then they do their jobs and yeah, they find a leasing solution, and then we can offer it to them, and then, most of the time that’s done pretty quickly. They take one week maybe, and then we can make them an offer, and then together with the media department of the airport, we can assess the media value for them, and then we can each see how far we can make a profit for them and how fast. 

And is it typically like most airports would have or at least substantial airports would have a media partner that owns the out-of-home media rights for that property, like a JCDecaux or whatever. Would they be the ones selling this space? 

Remco Veenbrink: It would be a collaboration. We had an airport that already had that concession in place. Decaux is a big player, Clear Channel in the States and there are many more players. Some airports still do it themselves. They don’t have an intermediary agency in between. But we would work together with those players and agree to make an agreement. 

We saw in Europe, here in the airport that really like our solution for the added experience was to be installed near the security area where we also proposed a nice film for the security to show how it’s done, those instructional films, but we had some nice content creators, and the airport really wanted it because they also had a glare control issue near the security area. So they just came to our table and said, “The two of you need to fix this.”

We see Decaux as a partner. We are not the media agency, we can turn any content into glare control and that is our main differentiation, and we don’t have a sales department that reaches out to advertisers on a daily basis.

What about control of the displays, in terms of airports again Decaux or the airport themselves will have some sort of a content management system, whether it’s Decaux with a BrightSign, or I don’t know whether they’re using Omnivex or whatever it may be. Do they work with your CMS or do they have to use your content management software to update your Video Window display?

Remco Veenbrink: The latter, because we need to adjust the content to work as glare control. So our content is the active layer, controlling the amount of glare control, controlling the amount of transparency. It’s a good question by the way because that’s what we’re now working on with our software engineers, to create an API that can fetch content and then on the fly, adjust it. 

The challenge there is that our screens are depending on where they’re placed, but they’re so big that architecture and architectural elements like pillars and columns, and what have you are breaking up the display, the canvas, and the building is part of the canvas.

So what we want to automate, and this is under development, is to do an automated plan and scan, where we make sure that crucial areas are always shown at the unobstructed areas of our screen and logos, they cannot be obstructed by a pillar, eyes shouldn’t be blocked by column, that type of intelligence. That’s what we’re now implementing in our content management system. Other than that, we have an editor standby that can do that on the fly, but if we want to move into programmatic advertising this has to be developed and that’s what we’re doing, but that comes with a lot of convolutional neural networking image recognition, it’s pretty next level. 

Complicated stuff, yeah. So speaking of complication you’re having to come at this from a few different angles, and from what I can see from your background, you’ve got one founder, who’s a Banker, and the other founder who’s has a fine Arts degree, but you’re dealing with structural glass design, you’re dealing with the engineering of sound baffling at an airport, you’re dealing with software for glare control and you’re dealing with media displays. It’s very involved. 

Remco Veenbrink: It’s a lot of challenges, yeah, but we have great advisors. You know this is something across multiple sectors: glass construction glass is a world of itself with a lot of demands and safety regulations. We don’t pretend to know that, but we do know people who are fully an expert in their field, and yeah we tied that all together. So we have the expert of liquid crystal display so he knows that world. Glass construction we work with Bill Kington who is really open to innovation. That’s a strong name. The content management systems, we work with the best of the brightest from the technical university here in terms of computer engineering. 

So that is what we are developing in-house. We always reach out for the best expert available, and if he’s not available, we make sure that he gets interested in what we’re doing. 

So would you say you’re a software company primarily? 

Remco Veenbrink: Yeah. Now that we start using high-resolution screens, we decided to be agnostic in terms of our display components and we set up a whole spec sheet. It’s built on our spec sheet but we’re not intending to build displays, that’s a whole industry in itself and pretty challenging and its margins. There’s only a couple of OEMs left, so it’s all consolidating.

Yeah, that is a market, and once again, there we just reached out to the best and they know how to do it. 

So if you’re going to sell against some of the other technologies that are emerging out there like transparent mesh LED and LED on a film that can be adhered to window glass, and then even LED embedded in glass, what’s the argument for your product versus those options? 

Remco Veenbrink: Those options are great, but they’re not glare control. So you can’t put them in the sun and try to read them. If you’re looking against the sun with those structures, it’s not happening. 

If the Window did not have any active glare control happening, is it 100% transparent, or is there a kind of sense of haze or how does it look? 

Remco Veenbrink: It’s transparent, but as you probably know liquid crystal displays work with polarizers. So you don’t have a hundred percent transparency, but the transparency that we have is very much comparable to glass that is implemented in buildings these days.

It’s tinted in some ways?

Remco Veenbrink: There’s always a tint in the glass, and there are coatings in the glass which are fixed. So the thing with that, and the great advantage of tintable glasses, for instance, in the winter, you don’t want the block the heat. You can actually use the temperature that the sun produces in the infrared spectrum to warm up your terminal and that can really save a lot of money and really save a lot of energy and really help reduce the carbon footprint. So if you could switch on and off the ecoating, that would be really interesting. 

That doesn’t exist. So Ttintable glass can really help to warm up in the winter, and in the summer we play our content a bit darker, and then it’s tintable glass and you can really help to bring down the energy usage to a good place.

Are there any limits in terms of display performance or updating speed? So for instance, you can do 30 frames per second only?

Remco Veenbrink: We can do 60 frames per second, which really makes it stand out from the others that use the electrochromic process, which is a chemical process where ions go back and forth. That takes minutes. So you know, that will not bring any video footage to the window anytime soon, but there are developments which also use liquid crystal display. For instance, Merck is developing tintable glass based on that technology, and we were in touch with them.

We’re in touch with the founders of that technology. Actually, they already exited the company, so those are our advisors. So these guys who have developed this for Merck are also advising us on how to do it, and yeah, they don’t do segmented, they do mono cells, big mono cells, but switching time is indeed much faster.

And then there are suspended particle devices from research frontiers which also take seconds to alter the state. Nothing that we know of is as fast as our technology, which is 60 frames per second, and that allows for video.

And in terms of updating, if there was some sort of an alert for say a gas leak in an airport terminal and your CMS is tied into the alerting system, would it take minutes for that alert to show on your screen, or would it be as instantaneous as it would be on a normal digital sign?

Remco Veenbrink: No, we run with their signage systems. So, they can overrule any content that we’re playing, and they can own their communication tool, obviously.

So it’s not going to take, as you were saying where some of these other technologies take several minutes for a new message to build on the screen or whatever. if there’s an alert, it’s an alert and it happens right away. 

Remco Veenbrink: Yeah, we can install that. We haven’t installed that yet, but yeah our technology allows for that. That’s like an API integration where they have pre-set images or notifications that they can then push, and when they push something, it will over overwrite or override any other content. 

Okay. So you’re in Rotterdam’s airport right now. Are you fully in there or do you just have a demo?

Remco Veenbrink: No, we actually have two installations. One is facing Northeast and the other is facing Southeast. 

And that’s like one exit away from your offices, right? 

Remco Veenbrink: Yeah. 

And you’re also in Amsterdam’s Schiphol? 

Remco Veenbrink: The funny thing is that the Schiphol group actually is the owner of Rotterdam airport.

So it’s a small country and the Schiphol group has several airports, amongst which also JFK Terminal 4 and Brisbane. So yes, we are talking to the Schiphol group, and they’re all very eager to come over in two months to see our new installation, a high-resolution installation. So yeah, we have high hopes there.

So if I wanted to see Video Window right now, I would have to go through Rotterdam airport? 

Remco Veenbrink: Yeah. For now, that’s true. But we’re also talking to a museum in Philadelphia that’s interested. We are discussing some installations with airports in the States. But due to Covid, it’s a bit quiet on that front. 

What’s the state of the company right now? You’re obviously a startup. How big are you? How are you funded? 

Remco Veenbrink: Oh, we’re bootstrap, self-funded so far and any investors out there can reach out to us. 

We are nine people at this point. As you said, there are two founders, and we have seven software engineers and they’re all doing honors programs, and so they’re the best of the brightest and we’re very happy with our team, but we’re looking to expand. 

We to set up shop maybe even the States, we were reached out by several system integrators who would like to represent us in the States and in Canada. Also in the middle East. So it’s starting to move fast now, and that’s really great to see because as a startup, you have a dream, you build on it. That’s great to see that it’s catching on and South by Southwest also really helped in that sense. We were pitching there. We were second in the future of travel still.

So that was a very nice experience, and we were also actually approached by a American investors. So we are discussing raising money. 

Yeah, there seems to be a fair amount of investor money out there right now. I get phone calls and emails. 

Remco Veenbrink: Yeah, indeed. Yeah, interest is so low that, if you have money you better invest it into something. And yeah, it’s a very likable product. It’s pretty cool. It has a high wow factor. It serves people, the planet, profit, and it gets noticed. 

That’s great. All right, Remco, thank you very much for spending some time with me. 

Remco Veenbrink: Yeah, Dave, thank you very much for doing this podcast. 

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