John Steinhauer Of Barco On Creating Memorable Visual Experiences In Big Spaces

June 30, 2021 by Dave Haynes

Technology advances have made it feasible and relatively easy to fill large spaces, inside or outside, with big digital visuals that fill a defined space like a building lobby or other physical structure – with the idea of creating experiences that are memorable and have some sort of desired impact.



It’s being done with large format LED video walls, with projection mapping and still, in some cases, with skinny bezel LCD.

Barco is in an interesting position because the company does all three, and has done so for many years. One of the first high-profile examples of what’s been coined “techorating” (not my favorite phrase, but I get it) was the Comcast headquarters tower in Philly, which filled the entire back wall of its vast lobby with LED. That project was done, more than a dozen years ago, using fine pitch Barco LED product, and the experience is now a tourist attraction.

I spoke with John Steinhauer, VP of Entertainment for Barco in the Americas, about the whole notion of incorporating large format digital into the original design or renovations for large spaces – from building lobbies to airports and attractions. We talk about the business model and recommended approaches.

We also get into his experience in the past year. He started his new role – driving business for things like entertainment attractions, sports venues, live event and cinema – just as COVID hit, and all those activities dried up.

They’re coming back, he says, in a BIG way. 

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TRANSCRIPT

John, thank you for joining me. Can you tell me what your role is at Barco? 

John Steinhauer: Yeah, of course. First, Dave, thanks for having me. I really appreciate spending some time with you today. I am the Vice President of Entertainment for the Americas at Barco and I came to this position at an interesting time, almost the first days of the pandemic.

Timing is everything they say, and I like to tell people that my first year has been an eventful year, but certainly, there’ve been no events and that was a challenge. But it did put us in a position to really look at our organization, look at our strategy or go to market, fortify our strengths and address our weaknesses. So it’s really been a great first year and reflecting on it now and we’re getting prepared for the big recovery, is what this is all about currently, and I think we are. 

VP Entertainment sound like something teenage kids would love to have for their dad? What does it encompass? 

John Steinhauer: I think eventually it will encompass some free tickets to shows. I know that you’re right, Dave, my kids said, wow, that’s a great job. What are the perks? 

Yeah, but I’ll define what entertainment is at Barco. It is our live events business, our rental and staging business, our proAV business, and our cinema business. There’s also a group that does high-end residential and simulation, which is a really interesting business for us with flight simulators and things like that, a lot of government contracts. So we really have a wide expansive portfolio that addresses a lot of very different applications.

As you said, just as you got started, I’m sure one of your first charges was to identify what the opportunity pipeline looks like and everything else, and then a pandemic hit and most of your markets dried up. 

John Steinhauer: Exactly. There were really spots of innovation along the way to where I was really impressed by the live events industry and their resiliency and their creativity and how nimble they are, just by virtue of what they do. They build these elaborate systems and solutions for one night and they tear them down and take them somewhere else the next day. It’s just who they are in terms of being nimble and things like using LED for XR stages, it became something really interesting, and a lot of people started driving a new form of production, you know camera production in front of the LED. So things like that came out, and other trends are really blossoming now around immersive museums, for example.

So I think this is an industry that has a lot of resolve and it’s going to take much more than a pandemic to bring it down. I’ll tell you, I’ve been really impressed by the caliber of the partners we have and their strength and keeping a positive attitude, and really looking for ways to drive forward. If an industry ever deserved a comeback as this one does, it’s going to be epic. I tell people that a lot, and when everybody hits the road at the same time, which every artist is hoping to do, it’s going to be the recovery of a lifetime, I think, and we’re really looking forward to it. 

Why do you describe it that way? Are you hearing that sort of thing that there’s going to be this tidal wave of live events and installations and everything else? 

John Steinhauer: Yeah, everything from residencies in Las Vegas being announced, to the first shows putting dates out now. We do think there’ll be a little latency around the sales side of the business because so much equipment has been dormant for so long, and it’s finally going to be back at work. So it’s not a statement on sales as much as it is on activity levels that will eventually become, I think, a boom all the way around. 

You talked about the pause that COVID has created, and I’ve certainly spoken with a number of companies who said they use the past 15-16 months to examine what they do, their processes and their products and the whole nine yards. 

I would imagine the same thing as applied here, that a lot of the people who are in the various facets of the entertainment industry, see the time to re-examine how they do things and maybe stop the momentum that kind of saw them doing things a certain way because they’d always done it that way.

John Steinhauer: Yeah, definitely, and for us at Barco, we’ve had a history of being somewhat of a siloed company and difficult to do business with at times, and we had a chance to really reflect during this pause to just figure out culturally, what needed to change in how we went to the market and how we work together internally and just making it an easier experience to do business with us.

I think when things light up, the community is really going to feel that. I know that during the downs. They’re feeling it, we’re staying connected. We have furloughed employees, like most of our customers have too. We’re bringing back people. We’re actually investing in hiring now, too. I think the future looks bright. We’re guilty of investing ahead of revenue a little bit because we know it’s a safe bet. This is an industry we know a lot about. We consider ourselves members of the community and not just vendors to the community. So we’re reading the tea leaves and getting ready for what we think is going to be an explosive rebound. 

Barco is in an interesting position because when we talk about some of these large-format displays that you see in live events and museums and buildings and everything else, they’re LED, they’re fine-pitch LED, but you can do fine-pitch LED, but you can also do projection and you can also do a narrow-bezel LCD.

You’ve got the UniSee product, which genuinely has narrow bezels, unlike sometimes I see the product literature, I think that’s not terribly narrow, but you’re calling it invisible. 

John Steinhauer: Yeah. We have a broad portfolio and you’re right, and UniSee is definitely a big part of that portfolio.

An LED is the first thing people think of when they think of wow factor in large format. But when you add in projection as you said, things like projection mapping are really experiencing a resurgence now, because not only are businesses trying to bring their employees back to their offices but the cities and municipalities are trying to get people out of their homes again.

We’re doing some incredibly creative outdoor mapping On bridges, landmark buildings, and cathedrals, and it’s a global trend that is really exciting for us because we have a lot of horsepowers when it comes to those super high lumen projectors. 

And the other big shift there is that it’s a lot easier to do.

I wrote a book, like a coffee table book, about projection mapping, 10 years ago, and at that time, it was just starting to emerge, but it was incredibly complicated to do, just the alignment and everything else, and now it’s almost widgetized software. 

John Steinhauer: Yeah, and it’s crazy flexible too.

If you look at this trend of the Van Gogh exhibits, that’s going around the world, really taking traction here in the US too in multiple cities. They’re re-purposing real estate, and sometimes warehouses and old buildings and building a museum and so think about that, the complexities of mapping, where you have to place the projectors. You’re just going into an environment that is unknown sometimes and very different at times, and trying to position everything to get it just right, and that series has been incredibly successful for us, and we have a line of projectors that fits the bill perfectly, and it’s one of those situations, it was something in our portfolio that wasn’t the rocket ship. 

It was the G-60 that I’m referring to, and this particular application put it on the map to the point where it’s a supply chain issue now, and that’s another podcast talking about the supply chain challenges currently, but it’s interesting too when these things hit, you’re not really sure what’s going to emerge as the solution for the future. You have to ride with the industry, I think and follow the community, especially the creative side of the business. If you ever put a product out in the market, tell them this is what it does. It won’t succeed. They’ll tell you what it will do and you’ll work with them to make sure it does. 

Yeah, I was gonna say that I did an interview the other day where I was the person being interviewed and we’re talking about trends and everything else and I said, one of the big mistakes I see over and over again regardless of the size of the project is people go in thinking about how they’re going to apply a particular type of technology instead of, looking at the scenario, the environment, the circumstances, the dynamics of it and everything else, and then figuring out okay, if we’re going to do something here, what would be the technology that would work best? 

But, you see over and over again, people saying, “I’m going to put in a big LED video wall”, or “I’m going to put in a fine bezel or a narrow bezel LCD video wall here”, and they don’t really know why. They haven’t really thought about the content yet, but they’re going to do it. 

John Steinhauer: Exactly, and I think one of the strengths of our portfolio, in just that situation, we’ve been doing this during the downturn with the re-educating ourselves teams and training them, is that we’re not selling tiles. We’re listening to what the application is, what the experience needs to be, and then fitting a solution into that, and one of the nice things about the entertainment businesses is that we do get to speak directly with the creative decision-makers and the folks that are doing the design early enough, where we can have those kinds of conversations. We’re not just responding to RFPs and things like that. 

Yeah. One of the things that have also impressed me lately is when you have jobs that mash-up different technologies. So instead of it just being a LED video wall, that’s part of it, but there’s also projection and they’re reactive with each other and they’re synced. That to me is really exciting ‘cause you’re doing the walls, you’re doing the ceiling, you’re doing the floors, potentially. 

John Steinhauer: Yeah, and that’s we’re going to get to this “techorating” idea, and it’s interesting because that term is old, it’s I think it dates back to ‘08-’07, maybe even earlier.

That term used to mean something, and I think now it means something very different, but it’s what you just described. It’s the overall experience, and there can be a number of ways you get there and it’s not necessarily a wow factor lobby at a casino, it can be eBay’s headquarters in California, it can be any corporate customer. 

I know you have a digital signage background, a lot of signage, essentially pushes information to your people, and that plus an information and an entertainment component to that, and an immersive environment that draws people to the environment, whether it’s bringing employees back or bringing people out of their homes into a city street, this application is different than the original, the original “techorating” trend. 

Yeah, techorating is one of those terms that makes me cringe a little bit, but not as much as phygital. That one, just nails on a chalkboard, but I get it, I understand the concept around it. 

What are you actually seeing out there? I think of techorating, going back to the Comcast Tower, which is actually a Barco installation going back a dozen years, maybe even more, where they filled a whole wall with LEDs that picked up the look and the look of the side wood walls, and all of a sudden stuff appears on it. Are we seeing much more of that? I get the sense that it’s happening, but we’re all in our little bunkers here, so I don’t see it in person anymore.

John Steinhauer: Yeah, exactly, and that’s the whole point, right? I think what employers are trying to do is creating that pull back to the office instead of just saying, okay, here’s how it is, you have to come back to work. Cause we know how that’s going out there, people are getting comfortable in a new workplace and some roles will be distributed and remote, and we’re even going through this at Barco. Some roles really require you to be in the office. 

With the whole techorating, I think it’s interesting because at one point, it was all flash and no one’s ever seen it before, and I always go back to the Cosmopolitan Hotel, that’s the first time I really experienced it. Super cool. But this is more, I think a lighthouse rediscovery of that. The concept’s there, but it’s really safely drawing ships back to shore, bringing the employees back into their workplaces, and depending on budgets, it can be very elaborate, it can be the kinds of things you saw in that lobby at the Cosmopolitan, or it can be just more technology than usual in different places, like not just in the experience center up on the top floor, but throughout the organization, multi-purpose rooms will have more technology in them in different types of content.

I think this is also a great opportunity for our content providers. Companies who do this where, you know, before putting up displays in a break room or something was all about new policies, new hires, the temperature of the stock ticker, whatever. Now, employers want to create content that’s compelling and creative in those spaces.

Are you working directly or through some of the AV consultants that work with Barco, are you talking to people who design physical spaces and to engineers and to architects? 

John Steinhauer: Yeah, architects, meeting planners, all the above, consultants, everything you mentioned, Dave, that is the community. That’s really driving this because, unline pre-pandemic, where we were and before trends like this, it was very much established, “This is what you do. The briefing center is on the top floor. This is what resides in this room, this room, and this room.”

Now companies are taking a fresh approach and they need guidance. They need expertise, and they’re calling in these creative content companies to help. 

And is that part of the secret sauce, not making this an AV or IT project? It has to be something like from the very first meeting, the site survey, the walk-through, the whole bit where you’ve got to have the creative people, you’ve got to have the architect. You’ve got to have all the different parties that are going to touch on this to really make it work. Because if you just put in a screen and then say, now we need something on it, that’s not going to work! 

John Steinhauer: Exactly, and it is that immersive experience approach to these environments that weren’t there before.

What’s the business argument? 

John Steinhauer: I think the business argument mostly right now is bringing those folks back into the office, and having a compelling reason to get them out of their space. If we had a video for this podcast, I could show you that I have a very carefully curated environment in my home office but I started in the video conferencing world. We were trying to get HD out at Lifesize early days, and I learned that early on. There are a lot of colors in my office, Placed in the right places. Most people don’t do that, and I’m sure you’ve experienced this because everyone has. You’ve seen everything in the background.

You’ve seen spouses walking by, you’ve seen dogs and cats and landscapers wailing into the un-muted microphones outside the windows. 



In Canada, we have members of parliament who stripped down in the middle of conference calls.  

John Steinhauer: I’ve seen that viral clip, yes. (Laughter)

So I think what employers need is that environment where people say, okay I want to come back, and not only that, I want to be proud of the company I work for.

I work for a great organization. This is a cool job, and I love going to work every day, and the 30-40 minute commute is worth it because I have great bandwidth, I have amazing facilities, all those things, and this is just a part of that puzzle, bringing those employees back, I think.

Is that being driven by the employers? I mean, If you’re the anchor tenant in an office tower of some kind or big house office block, that’s one thing, but in a lot of cases, you have office towers where they might have 20 different tenants, and I’ve heard a number of times that commercial property owners are “techorating” their lobbies and other spaces because, A) it attracts tenants and B) it hangs on all the ones they have.

John Steinhauer: Exactly. Yeah, I think you’ve totally seen it in those types of spaces and other kinds of perks. We just built a new space in California, I was there earlier this week. We have a little health club in there, a little gym, all those amenities, to attract your folks back in.

Does it have to be on a grand scale, or are you seeing stuff that fits the size and maybe in a less vast space, you can also do something compelling? 

John Steinhauer: Yeah, it totally fits the size, and again, I’ll mention my trip to California this week. We have a lot of LEDs in our office. We don’t have big voltage ceilings. We don’t have a big grand lobby, but they’re placed properly where it makes the space seem bigger, it really does, but it doesn’t overpower the space. 

We had a really good design consultation upfront on how to utilize the space appropriately because you’re right too, you can totally overpower an environment. There can be heat dissipation issues that you don’t anticipate and you can turn your office into a tanning salon after a while if you have too many LEDs on them. 

Yeah, and I think that gets lost sometimes, in that everybody understandably because these are six-figure, potentially seven-figure projects. There’s a lot of money involved and the buyers are looking at the visual quality of the displays, obviously, but maybe they’re not thinking so much about things like heat generation, power consumption, weight, all those sorts of things. 

John Steinhauer: Absolutely. Yeah, and those are important considerations, and that’s why it really comes down to that team of consultants upfront. Everyone from the consultant themselves to the meeting space, the real estate, this is a team sell. We used to call it, I came from Whitlock before I joined Barco. So we were a large systems integrator, and we used to call it the Team bus. 

We put everybody on the Team bus to go to that meeting because we have to consider all those things before anybody sends out a quote or starts thinking about how they’re going to put this together. All those considerations have to be taken into account. 

Is that going to be problematic going forward because people are going to be more reticent to travel. Even if they’re vaccinated, they just say, you know what, I haven’t traveled in a year and a half, I don’t need to as much, or do you think it’ll just shift back to on-site meetings because if you want to do this you gotta be there? 

John Steinhauer: I think hybrid is here to stay. I’ll be honest with you as someone who walks the walk, right? Last week I was in Atlanta for a live event, and it was spectacular. It was an opportunity to shake hands, see old friends, and have corridor conversations between the sessions, and I flew home thinking, this is the greatest thing, I missed it so much, this is the only way to go. And the following day I had to part two of that session, which was a virtual session. Big WebEx, a hundred people at it, instead of the smaller group based on COVID guidelines of how many you can have in the office in Atlanta. 

So when I flew back here to Phoenix and I hosted that one, I just experienced all the benefits of reaching that many more people all at one time. The interactive chat boards we had, and we had production value on one side, and it was the best one to punch ever. I left there thinking, what we need to do as an organization is we have to figure it out to do both at once, right? We have to have that virtual aspect to go along with the live aspect so we can stream out to more people, we’re looking into doing that with our next event, and I think that’s going to carry over into live entertainment too, where these concerts, some cities are going to have restrictions on capacity, how many people can be in the arena and there’s going to need to be that live stream that goes out.

But there has to be value wrapped around it, incentive like a backstage meet and greet on video, question and answer for the artists after or before the show. All these pieces that first of all, make it something that you can charge for but also make it accessible to more people. So I think hybrid, overall, it’s not a trend at all. It’s something that’s here to stay. 

We’ve talked about office lobbies, building lobbies, that sort of thing, and you also mentioned museums and extended reality for production sets and so on. What kind of applications are you seeing out there?

John Steinhauer: The most established application is the Van Gogh tour that’s on right now, and that’s projection mapping on a large scale. So about 70 to 100 projectors in each location, just a lot of expertise in the mapping side of it. It’s just incredible. 

I have not been to one yet. I’ve been invited to an opening and in London in a few weeks, when I go over there with some customers, hopefully, guidelines permitting and that one’s called The Impressionists, so it’s a different group of artists. But that is quite established. The XR stage stuff, the shooting in front of the video wall is also in the trend stage right now. We speak to a lot of people that are really active in that space and they believe that’s here to stay too, but in a more of a hybrid: some location shooting, which is very expensive and some studio shooting around the LED wall.

We play a big role in that with our image processing and it’s an important sector for us. We feel as though there might be a shift from this pop-up experience out there. There was a need in the community, rose to the occasion, and created these studios and warehouses and all different kinds of locations. We think that trends are going to continue into the actual film studios and the Universals and the Sonys of the world too and that they’d have their own facilities over time. But right now it is in that trend phase, where it’s all being outsourced to out of necessity. 

Was that purely triggered by COVID or were some production companies starting to do that anyway?

John Steinhauer: They were starting to do that and they were on the bleeding edge, when this happened, it became more viable.

What about other places like attractions and sports and entertainment venues? 

John Steinhauer: Yeah, sports, in particular, has always been good for us. If you’re a hockey fan, you’re Canadian, so please tell me you’re a hockey fan. 

I have to say it quietly, or I’ll lose my passport, but I’m more into Premier League Football. 

John Steinhauer: Okay. Fair enough. You know the playoffs are going on right now. The Canadiens are making it to the Stanley cup. The team they beat, Las Vegas Knights are a customer of ours, and if you watch the openings and I love the difference between the arenas, right? Because Canada has a very limited capacity for the crowd, it is very obvious, and then when you go to Vegas, it’s a full house. The Canadian venue doesn’t have the same amount of technology built into it, and it’s pretty obvious when you watch on TV, but when you watch the Knights, well, it’s Vegas too.

But man, do they put on a show, and part of their show is our ice mapping. So the ice show you see at the beginning with all the player’s names and the flags when the anthems are being sung, that’s all our technology up in the rafters and we’ve had a lot of reference sites where we’re doing that in the NHL, a lot of new franchises or some anyway, coming into the league that we’re working with. My New York Islanders. I’m a born and raised Long Islander. Hopefully, we’ll win tonight and advance. But they’re building a new arena in Belmont, New York, which is right by the horse racetrack, and we’re working with them on design and things now, too. So yeah, in the sports arenas, mapping is a very good business for us. 

These are all-immersive, somewhat specialized things, but there’s a long tail in all these kinds of facilities, particularly when you get to sports and entertainment venues where they’re putting LED all over the damn place, is it inherent that you have to sell across the whole venue? 

Like you can do the LED ribbon boards, you could do the scoreboard, you could do the big, fine pitch displays on the concourse and the whole bed, or can you just do the projection mapping? 

John Steinhauer: Yeah, this is where our great partners come into play, and I’ll speak about Whitlock, which is no longer around, the expertise that we brought to the table was… 

They’re part of AVI-SPL, in case anybody’s wondering, they didn’t just die. 

John Steinhauer: No, they didn’t die. I exited before that piece of the puzzle came together. So I’ve never been a part of that team, but yeah, it turned into the big mega guys in the industry and they are very skilled at putting together applications like this, everything from scoreboards and things that you mentioned that we don’t do. They have access to that technology, all the audio, which is, a huge part of the venues. They do all that kind of stuff too. 

So I’m an architect listening to this, or I’m a designer or end-user potentially, how does one engage with Barco? Is it through your partners or is it direct? How does all that work? 

John Steinhauer: Yeah, it’s through our partners, and through our sales team here in the Americas. But the best way I would say, because I want to have something concrete to say here at the end, in terms of contacting us, is to contact me, you can contact me directly and I can steer you into any direction you need.

[email protected], and I’d be happy to help anyone who needs more information. 

Perfect. That’s a great way to end it. 

John Steinhauer: Thank you, Dave. 

Thank you. I appreciate your time. 

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