Anamorphic 3D LED Boards Are Amazing, But Limited. We Talk The Hows And Whys With Sensory Interactive

The 16:9 PODCAST IS SPONSORED BY SCREENFEED – DIGITAL SIGNAGE CONTENT

If you spend any time on Linkedin, or even platforms like Instagram and Twitter, you’ve likely seen quick videos of LED displays somewhere in Asia that are using anamorphic, three-dimensional creative to get viewer attention.

We’ve seen spaceships look like they are emerging from the screen. Giant sloshing waves inside what looks like an aquarium. Huge robot hands reaching out from the screen. And on and on.

It’s becoming a thing. But it is not a terribly well understood thing.

Which is why Larry Zoll from Sensory Interactive, which does what it calls dynamic real estate, reached out and suggested the emerging creative trend would be a great thing to explore in a podcast conversation.

Zoll is the managing director for technology and innovation at his firm, and has been fielding questions and requests about this stuff for a long time now. What’s clear is that not many people understand what’s going on and how it works. For example, customers ask if the LED display technology they have in place, or are putting up, will support the anamorphic creative pieces they want to do.

The short answer is yes, because this is all about the creative, and not about the display hardware.

We had a really good chat about what this visual trickery is all about, how it’s done, and its limitations. If you watch 10 videos out of China and South Korea that have anamorphic creative, you’ll notice nine of them are shot at a very specific angle. Because the visual effect may only work from that angle. 

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TRANSCRIPT

Larry, thanks for joining me. What’s your role at Sensory? 

Larry Zoll: I am the Managing Director of Technology & Innovation for Sensory Interactive. 

And what does that involve? 

Larry Zoll: That’s a great question. It involves a little bit of everything. We get involved in projects from conceptualization and revenue assessment all the way through content creation and operation of a lot of the projects that we get involved with.

My role really depends on what the scope of the project is. I help our design teams bring what they draw to life, I help our project management teams implement a lot of the technology that we’re talking about/that we’re implementing, and I am also the main point of contact for most of the vendors that we work with and learning about what’s available on the market and what’s new coming to the market and how we can best represent our client’s interests. 

So you’re the poor guy who gets the sales and biz-dev people walking up to you and saying, “Hey, I promised that we could do this. Can we?”

Larry Zoll: Yeah, that’s exactly right. “I already told him we could do that. It’s doable, right?” 

You’re in Boston, but Sensory is in a few cities, I think? 

Larry Zoll: We are in six cities. Our headquarters is in DC. We have offices in New York, Boston, Atlanta, Dallas, and Austin. 

Yeah, I had it in my head that Austin was the head office, but it’s just an office?

Larry Zoll: It is right now the biggest office, but the headquarters is in DC because that’s where Randy is and Randy’s our CEO. 

Okay, and how would you broadly describe the company, are you like a solutions provider, would you say you’re an integrator? 

Larry Zoll: No, we’re not an integrator. We don’t sell anything. We are an owner’s representative and a trusted advisor to our clients. We work with commercial real estate developers and corporations to help them bring digital experiences to life. 

Randy has trademarked the term, “Dynamic real estate” and that’s a large focus of what we’re doing. 

Like I said earlier, we really can work from conceptualization and revenue assessment all the way through operations. Our Austin team has a group of architects that do a lot of our design work. We have a full project management team that does construction project management for the projects that we get involved with. The revenue assessment team helps our clients to understand the potential return on investment and internal rate of return that’s associated with their projects. Our operations team in Dallas runs a lot of the installs that we end up installing. We have a creative team that can build content as well. 

Okay. So you would have a commercial property company come to you and say, “Hey, I saw this big LED display on the facade of this building downtown, whatever, or I saw it in the lobby of a commercial office tower. We’d like to do that. Please help us.”? 

Larry Zoll: Yeah, exactly, and that can mean a number of different things for a corporate client. That t might just mean that they’re looking for somebody to help them boost their brand presence in their building.

But more often than not, we’re working with clients who are looking to generate revenue off of their installs. Sometimes that’s a big lead. Sometimes it’s a network of LCDs. Sometimes the digital experience doesn’t necessarily have to have any display technology at all. It could be about analytics and all kinds of other stuff.

Okay. So one of the reasons we’re talking is because you sent me an email on my having written several posts recently about anamorphic 3D visuals on LED displays primarily in China, but also in Korea to some extent, and I wrote the other day about one in Indonesia, and there seems to be a lot of buzz and excitement around these displays because it gives you the sense that there’s something jumping out of the screen or emerging from a screen, but there’s a lot involved in it to get it right, and you were telling me that you have clients who are coming to you saying, “Hey, we saw this, can our LED display board do this?” 

Larry Zoll: Yeah. It’s been very interesting because those videos have been circulating foR the past six, nine months or something, and it’s very exciting to see, you see these videos from a street corner or from a highway and it looks like a spaceship or the wave is coming to crash down on you, and I think it’s very well-crafted content.

But I think there is maybe a misconception that what you’re seeing is based on the technology of the display itself and not the content that’s created for the display, and that’s why I emailed you. It’s a conversation I’ve had a couple of times with clients or prospective clients now about how, what your display is capable of is has nothing to do with not necessarily with the content that goes on it, but you have to think very intentionally about what that content is. 

Yeah. So you don’t need a particular type of display. We both go to lots of trade shows when those things were on and they have like glasses-free autostereoscopic, 3D LED, and this was this and that, and you see it and think this is stupid, but somebody’s trying to sell it and it’s not about that at all. It’s about what you produce. 

Larry Zoll: A hundred percent and just to put a point on that. I did some research on the displays after we had talked and the displays in Korea are the manufacturers that we see out in the marketplace on an everyday basis, there’s not one given manufacturer that’s creating a piece of hardware that is capable of displaying this content.

A well-planned installation with a capable content management system and capable processing power is going to be able to play this content regardless of who’s making the actual display. 

I pay attention to this stuff all day every day, and when I first started seeing these anamorphic displays or anamorphic content pieces, I was thinking this is pretty amazing, and I got a note from somebody else who was a content creator that said, “Yeah it’s very cool but what you need to understand is in a lot of cases, the visual effect that you’re wowed by is only visible from a very precise angle, and it’s usually with those ones that wrap around a corner.” I don’t know what the geometric term is, but it’s off that angle, right?

Larry Zoll: Yeah. I noticed the same thing. Almost every video, especially if it’s the one display in Korea. They’re all taken from basically right off of the corner of that display. 

The way the anamorphic content is created is that it’s basically a morphed perspective. So since you’re morphing the perspective, that morphed perspective is only going to be effective from a very specific point of viewing comb. So if you go out to the far side, either one of the far sides of that display, it’s going to look very different than it does from that corner, which is one of the reasons I think the Jakarta display is so interesting because the content on that display is meant to be viewed straight on, which I imagine, it provides a much more consistent view of the content. 

Yeah, just for people who are listening: the Jakarta display is on the side of a building, a commercial building on a busy roadway, although I think every roadway in Jakarta is busy, and the way it was designed to take on the look of the building and the concrete horizontal bands on that building, and then you see from distance, stuff just appearing to emerge out of that building, and you get that dimension and unlike, as you were saying, it’s not just from a certain corner, you can see it from a faraway, driving along this roadway. 

Larry Zoll: The whole process is very interesting though. I was talking to the head of our content creation team the other day about this, and it’s such a precise process to put these pieces together because of the way you have to morph the perspective on these things, creating it as a is quite an impressive feat.

Is there a toolset for it or is there like an Unreal Engine for this kind of thing? 

Larry Zoll: I don’t believe there’s a specific toolset. We were talking about it and from what I understand and keep in mind, I’m not a content creator. I’m a general technology guy…

But you know how to talk to the animals… 

Larry Zoll: (Laughter) I do, yeah. But from what I understand, the content can be created with any of the other tools that are used to create content. It’s a matter of understanding the process and doing the math to morph the perspective correctly.

Interestingly, I think the term anamorphic’s original definition was surrounded by the aspect ratio of different films, so changing a 16:9 film to a 21:9 film is an example of doing something anamorphic and so using the term for creating this 3D content is somewhat of a new concept. 

Yeah. These are visual tricks that have been around for centuries in a lot of respects. Obviously, there weren’t motion graphics in the 1400s, but there were Trompe-l’œil paintings way back then that were effectively doing the same kind of thing, where it creates this idea of dimension. 

Larry Zoll: Yeah, a hundred percent. If you search YouTube for 3D anamorphic before any of the content that we’re seeing on the digital displays now, you get a bunch of tutorials about basically how to create a 3D anamorphic effect with paper. So a hundred percent, this has been around for a long time in a variety of formats, and I think this is just the latest iteration of that. 

So if I’m a motion graphic designer and I realize neither of us are, how steep of a learning curve is there to do this stuff well? 

I can’t imagine that if I’m used to just creating Ad spots for, I don’t know, a JC Pennys or something like that, with price slides in, the photo slides out, all this and that to then have somebody say, “Okay, now do this!” There is like a Mount Everest curve, right? 

Larry Zoll: Again, neither one of us are content creators, so everything might be useless, but from what I have seen, I don’t know that it’s a huge learning curve. I guess that depends on your skills and your expertise, but it looks like it is largely centered around creating a grid for your piece of content that would represent your display and then creating a secondary grid on which you build that content and then stretching and morphing the two grids so that they match, and that’s where the crux of it comes in. 

Now, how do you figure out what the proportions of each of those grids are? I don’t know. That’s not my area. I don’t know what math or what other skills are necessary to figure out what those two grids look like. But I don’t believe it’s necessarily a huge learning curve, but there’s definitely some process there. 

The display layer – as we were saying earlier, there’s no specific type of display that supports this, but do things like a pixel pitch or anything else factor in terms of the quality of it, other than just the pure viewing quality as it relates to distance? 

Larry Zoll: I’m sure as with any other display or the content for any display, you need to be cognizant of what you’re designing for and who your primary viewing audiences are. When we talk about LEDs, we’re very intentional about the pitch that the display is manufactured out of, because we are thinking about who’s going to be using that display and where they’re going to be standing, or what area they’re going to be walking through.

I think as long as your display has been well thought out, I think that the level of thought that goes into anamorphic content would be equal to any other content. 

When I had demos years ago of some of the early glasses-free 3D LCDs that were coming on the market and never really went anywhere, two of the things that I was warned about were: a) the video files are monsters, and b) they take a lot of time to render and some skills around it too to do it well. Is that the case with this or is it just the way you produce it and then it’s just a video file like any video file? 

Larry Zoll: It’s basically a video file. We have seen internally, we have seen a lot of changes in the way that we create content over the past couple of years. We have our farm of servers that we use for rendering our content, and obviously, the amount of cores you have for processing has a direct effect on how long a piece of content takes to render. 

We, and other content creators that we’ve been speaking with over the past, I don’t know, I’ll say 12 to 18 months are really starting to take advantage of some of the tools out there that don’t require that sort of rendering time. There are more and more content creators that we’re seeing who are taking advantage of things like Unreal Engine and Unity and things like Touch Designer to create content that’s immersive and realistic and easily adaptable without a lot of the large rendering times that we see from a lot of the more traditional content creation tools.

So let’s talk about – for lack of a better description – the point of these things. 

I’ve seen a lot of these videos and it’s a flying saucer emerging from the corner of a building or a bull jumping out or whatever it may be, and I thought these are really cool, but I’m not sure what the point is, and as a company that works with these real estate companies and they come to you and say, “Hey, we want to do this!” 

What’s the process and the needs assessment and the decision-making that you do that would decide whether this makes sense to do? 

Larry Zoll: That’s a really interesting question.

I think the point of the ones that you’ve seen and the ones that I’ve seen are exactly what we’ve seen, it’s just getting eyes on these things, and so many of them, I can name at least three or four off the top of my head that have gone viral, that have gotten millions of views on whatever online platform you’ve seen it on.

What does that do for the display itself or the brand or the owner? It’s a great question. I mean I can’t think of a single one of them that has a brand associated with them or has a name associated with them. It took me a few minutes of Googling just to figure out where one of the displays in Asia was, and who did the content. So whenever we’re talking with clients, especially when we’re talking with clients who are looking for revenue-generating displays or revenue-generating projects, we’re discussing the entire life cycle with them. 

I mean content is so important and keeping content fresh is so important, but if the goal is to bring recognition or brand presence or something then that needs to be a major part of the conversation throughout the life cycle of the project.

So if you have something like a giant wave splashing against an aquarium-looking LED facade, what’s that doing?

Larry Zoll: That’s a good question. I don’t know if I have a direct answer for you. As I said, there’s nothing on that giant waves splashing that tells me where it is or who’s sponsoring it, or why I should be paying attention to it. It just looks really cool, and it’s great to look really cool. It’s important sometimes just to demonstrate what these things are capable of. 

I don’t know why it is important if you’re in transactional ads or if you’re a sponsorship partner. It’s hard to say without any sort of messaging on there at all.

So it may be a simple case of this being a somewhat nascent idea at least for LED video boards and the early creators of content are doing stuff that just looks cool, and maybe the next wave is stuff that actually has some brand relevance or some more relevance to the location or whatever. 

Larry Zoll: It could very well be.

It kinda reminds me of the hologram from Back to the Future 2 with the stadium, it’s headed in that direction, right? So right now, we have a bunch of people who are creating amazing-looking content that is just amazing-looking content, and maybe the next wave of that is a transactional ad campaign that’s taking advantage of those tools to create something that really brings a lot of excitement around a given brand or something like that.

Is there any reason why you could not do this on, let’s say a 90-degree corner with a pair of 85-inch LCD displays, would you be able to do the same thing? 

Larry Zoll: That’s a good question. I think you might have some trouble because with the LCD you’re going to have a bezel there in the middle, which might have an effect on the perspective, and the viewing angle on those 90-degree LCDs is not going to be as good as being around the corner with LEDs.

So I don’t know if that would be as effective. If you were going to do it with an LCD, I have to imagine you probably want to go more with the straight-on shot.

And could you do it with projection mapping, if they are edge-blended? 

Larry Zoll: I don’t see why not. There’s already so much you can do with projection mapping that you can’t do with anything else. I don’t see why that would present any challenge. 

So for all of the real estate companies who you work with, when you say they’re trying to monetize, is it primarily through third-party advertising, or do they quantify their monetization in other ways?

Larry Zoll: When we approach a new client and when we’re trying to figure out a plan for new ways for clients to engage in revenue-generating displays, it can really be through any number of different methods. 

It could be a straightforward, transactional advertising agreement where the real estate owner works directly with the media sales company. It could also take the form of partnerships or sponsorships or any number of different agreements, either directly with brands or with media sales agencies or something similar. 

I have heard a number of times from companies that work with real estate firms that they’re putting large LED video walls into the lobbies of their buildings or some other public area in a building with a monetization plan, but it doesn’t have anything to do with advertising, it has to do with recruiting new tenants and retaining the ones that they already have. Do you hear that? 

Larry Zoll: That’s something we come across for sure. Creating amenities is another thing that we’re working on actively with a number of our corporate clients, and something that doesn’t have to be directly monetized to have value. 

I think that’s a part of what’s been successful about some of our more corporate work is that we help them create these environments that are exciting and associate a brand with a look and a feel and something dynamic. And I think that in and of itself has a lot of value, not just from an amenity standpoint, but also from a brand-building standpoint. 

You know, if your building has a large LED in the lobby and you’re able to sell that to a particular client because they want to make sure that they have space for their brand to be seen outside of 10-30 floors in the building, I think that’s absolutely valuable. 

Yeah, I mean Comcast Center is an example of a very large corporation doing that in their lobby for 10+ years now, but I’m sure there are other buildings that have multiple tenants where they’re just trying to create an overall buzz about the place and make people think, “Okay, this is a cool building to locate my company in”, or “I want to stay here because these guys have this and other places don’t”, and “This is what impresses my clients and my staff.”

Larry Zoll: Sure, absolutely. We’ve done a few of those ourselves. (Laughter)

What do you see as important to still be developed in this wall space. So when I think of it, I think of LEDs still being quite fragile unless you’re using these ones with hardened coatings. Is that important if you’re putting something in a public space? 

Larry Zoll: Yeah, I think we’re in a really interesting time in the narrow pitch industry right now. There are a number of different ways that a lot of the manufacturers are thinking about a) the pitch itself, and b) how to make these displays more viable longer-lasting, and all of that. 

It’s really interesting watching the industry develop around that right now. We’ve gotten to a point where I liken it to the digital camera industry. For a long time, it was all about megapixels, and then at a certain point, everyone realized for the everyday person, there’s not a huge difference between 15 megapixels and 20 megapixels, so what else are we going to do? We’re going to increase the sensor size and talk more about the color depth and gamut and all of that, and I think we’re getting to a very similar spot in the narrow pitch display industry because we’ve gotten to a point where there are multiple manufacturers out there at this point who have sub-one-millimeter displays.

So what else are you going to do? Everybody knows that those displays are fragile. So we got to figure out a way to make them less fragile. So does that mean there’s a glue-onboard display or does that mean a chip-on-board or a flip-chip, there are a million different ways that are being explored across the industry to try and figure out the best way to approach this market that I would say we probably got another 18 to 24 months, at least of seeing things just really taking a lot of different turns until the industry really settles on a consistent path forward.

Yeah, I think we’re coming out of the pixel-pitch war so to speak, and everybody for the last five years has marketed on the basis of, our pixel pitch is just that much tighter than the next guys, and I’ve found it interesting with the manufacturers that are out there microLED that if you look at their product specs, their pixel pitch is like 1.2, 1.6, that sort of thing. 

But what it does, because the light emitters are so small, there’s all this black, so they’re marketing on the basis of, or at least they should be marketing on the basis of contrast as opposed to pixel-pitch, because who cares about that, it’s all about the black. 

Larry Zoll: Yeah, a hundred percent.

In addition to that, we’ve also been having a lot of conversations recently about pixel density, and why that matters in terms of the number of pixels and how quickly that number changes. In fact, I was talking to a client the other day who was trying to decide between a 1.67 mm display and a 2.5 mm display, and even though to a lot of people that sounds like a very slight difference, when you do the math and dig into it, you’re talking about a difference between close to 15,000 pixels per square foot, and 34,000 pixels per square foot.

That’s a huge difference. So there are a lot of different factors and when you bring micro-LEDs into the mix that changes, that changes the conversation again. Because obviously, they’re much smaller, so you can fit more in there. But yeah, contrast, pixel-density,  hardening technology, there are so many different ways that the industry is going right now, and it’s really fascinating to watch and to stay on top of. 

What about video wall processing? When I was at ISE last year, the last ISE that there was, I bumped into an old industry friend and he was sitting in a booth that was just being built, and I looked over at this display and thought, “Whoa, that looks really good”, and I asked him, what is that, like a 1.5 pitch? and he said, “No, it’s a four,” and I said, “really?” And he said, “I work for a video wall processing software and a server company now, and this is what we do.”

It was a bit of a revelation for me and granted that a lot of it goes to just choosing the right source content to begin with, but it really seems like video wall processing is one of those things that’s not all that greatly appreciated yet in the industry. 

Larry Zoll: I agree. Processing is important now and it’s going to become more and more important in the very near future because of these narrow pitch displays and how much more common they’re getting, resolutions explode very quickly. And you need to make sure that the processor and the equipment that you have behind the display that’s parsing all of that data, parsing all of that information, is able to provide you with the best possible result because once you get above 4K, I don’t think the industry is to a point yet where 8K is anywhere near standard, but once you get up to 4K, it becomes a real challenge to push all those pixels, and if you don’t have the right technology behind it to do that it doesn’t look good. You gotta make sure that equipment is rock solid. 

Is there a project that Sensory is working on right now that we should be looking out for some time in 2021 that you’re allowed to talk about?

Larry Zoll: That is a good question. We most recently finished advising on the Moynihan Train Hall in New York. We did the digital strategy on that and did a lot of the project management work on the install there, and if you haven’t seen it, it’s a really great representation of what a digital network can be. 

There’s LED, there’s LCD, and everything is tied together through transactional media and train schedules and it was a real feat by everyone who was involved in it. It turned out really well.

Yeah, and it’d be pretty wild for somebody who comes through an old Penn station in that basement like thing that’s there, and then you go across the street into this Train Hall and think, “Oh my God, this is beautiful!” 

Larry Zoll: It is a gorgeous space. 

Well, I look forward to seeing it, when and if we are ever allowed to travel again.

Larry Zoll: Absolutely. 

All right, Larry, thanks so much for your time. I appreciate it. 

Larry Zoll: It was great talking to you, Dave. Thank you.

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