LGA’s Much-Needed Reno Job Includes Dozens Of New LG Flight And Passenger Info Displays

I haven’t been through New York’s LaGuardia airport since moving to east coast Canada, as what flights that do get out of Halifax to New York head mostly to Newark.

Plus COVID.

But I’ve been aware that the much-loathed airport in Queens was finally transitioning from the look, feel and state of what you’d encounter traveling in the rougher parts of Central America to a clean, modern mass transport hub.

Terminal B, home to Air Canada’s gates and the reason why Toronto and Montreal business travellers have long hated LGA, has been renovated in a huge way. Based on PR sent my way from LG, a whole bunch of new information displays are helping guide travellers around the shiny, updated digs.

There are more than three dozen new LG displays in Terminal B, ranging from multi-display video walls and vertical info-totems to large, custom LED solutions. The displays are in place to relay flight information, steer people through screening, help navigate the terminals and drive travelers into retail establishments.

“Twenty-first century travelers expect twenty-first century airports, and that means they want information such as flight schedules, wayfinding maps and security procedures to be presented frequently in a highly visible manner, not on static signs or small TVs with spreadsheet-like visuals,” says Luis Vitureira, the technology manager for the airport’s development team. “Even though the existing displays in Terminal B were relatively new, we determined that some of them were undersized, and therefore were not sufficiently aiding airport guests or maximizing impact and value for advertising partners. We knew that we could improve the passenger experience with larger, brighter, more visible digital displays and content.”

The digital upgrades include:

  • two custom, ultrawide LG LED archway displays mounted over the security entrances. Each of the 1.89mm-pixel-pitch displays stretch 20 feet, covering the entire length of the security entrances;
  • flight information displays that vertically stack big 86-inch 4K displays;
  • seven new ReadySeeGo digital signage totems utilize vertically-oriented LG 86-inch Ultra Stretch displays to present typical security line information such as banned items, shoe and clothing requirements and any new procedures that are implemented;
  • two 88-inch LG Ultra Stretch landscape displays mounted back-to-back at baggage carousels, identifying which flight’s baggage is on which carousel, showing taxi wait times, directions to public transit pickups and the designated ride-share pickup zone.

THAT is an airport that badly, badly, badly need a reno job (or bulldozer) so it is great to see new signage that is most importantly in spruced-up surroundings.

Now do those awful circular terminals in the old part of Newark’s airport.

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