Taking Analog Style, And Going Digital With It

Here’s a digitized take on those analog flip-flap, flip-disc boards, like the ones coming out of Philadelphia profiled yesterday.

The New Zealand wing of the Flight Centre travel agency chain, if it is like Flight Centres I’ve seen elsewhere, has for many, many years had signs in windows and inside that list airfare costs for a series of destinations. It’s the sort of thing that begged to go digital.

What they’ve done in the land of the All Blacks is put window screens that are fully digital, but use software and creative to pick up the nice design of those electro-mechanical signs. So they look like old-school flight advisory boards at an airport.

The NZ-based CMS and solutions company Wallflower put the project together.

Dave Haynes

Dave Haynes

Editor/Founder at Sixteen:Nine
Dave Haynes is the founder and editor of Sixteen:Nine, an online publication that has followed the digital signage industry for more than 13 years. Dave does strategic advisory consulting work for many end-users and vendors, and also writes for many of them. He's based near Halifax, Nova Scotia.
Dave Haynes

@sixteennine

13-year-old blog & podcast about digital signage & related tech, written by consultant, analyst & BS filter Dave Haynes. DNA test - 90% Celt/10% Viking. 😏😜🍺
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Dave Haynes

2 thoughts on “Taking Analog Style, And Going Digital With It”

  1. Nice touch to bring back the look and feel of that bygone era when air travel was viewed as a glamorous way to travel. I don’t think the frequent flyers I know would say thats the case today. As a digital creative updating the content should be a breeze.

  2. The content is pulled in real-time from the Flight Centre website and refreshed whenever the display changes which is normally every 2 minutes.

    When possible we like to source data in real-time to save manual updating. One of our unusual ones was for an Australian series of courts where we read a copy of the Word format Court listing for each day and extract relevant details to display automatically. Staff have to do nothing more than they already did when sending out listings to the newspapers. It has the advantage that immediate changes are simply made by editing the document.

    We also did an intelligent advertisement display for a Casino series of restaurants. We monitor the booking system and automatically display more ads for a restaurant with few bookings and vice versa. All this happens in real-time.

    Tony Scott Wallflower CEO

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