Aerva Twitter Tool Makes Tweet Stream Safer For Digital Signage Networks

Aerva was one of the first digital signage software companies to jump on the Twitter visualization thing, and the company has announced a new product called AerTweet that significantly juices up the offer.

“Aerva also created our Twitter widget almost five years ago now—in the early days of Twitter,” founder and CEO Sanjay Manandhar related via email. “We learned tremendously about its use-cases in the field. AerTweet is a response to many of our customers, who want much, much more control over twitter feeds on digital displays.

As sticky and awesome as Twitter is, many brands want to protect and manage what gets put out on their behalf on public displays. So, AerTweet has its own web-based moderation of open tweets, but also can display tweets from only certain handles, filter in/out certain hashtags, users, mentions, etc. Also, we have built in heuristics and algorithms for fraud detection, etc.

AerTweet was a big part of a recent Doritos Locos Tacos multi-channel campaign. Running off a specifically designed hashtag, AerTweet displayed tweets on billboards in Time Square and LA’s Sunset Boulevard. Aerva developed a Keepsake Gallery that let users get a record of their tweet on the billboard, or view tweets in real-time on a live stream camera feed on the Taco Bell microsite developed for the camapign.

“The success of Taco Bell’s AerTweet project sets a new precedent for major brands and how they can employ UGC (user-generated content) and social media,” says Manandhar in a news release. “We develop the tools that empower brands to embrace UGC and manage the versatile and ever-changing nature of that content.”

Cambridge, Mass-based Aerva has a pile of similar widgets, such as Weather, Pic2Screen, Poll2Screen, Text2Screen, QR Code, Mobile Coupons, Mobile Contest, YouTube, Flickr and more running on its AerWave platform.

It’s a good, necessary move. Running Twitter visualizations is pretty easy stuff these days, but just pointing to a hash tag or keyword means all kinds of crap and nastiness can find its way on to screens. You need moderation. LocaModa was probably the first in the space to really look at Twitter, and more recently we’ve seen good work by Insteo and X2O Media.