LG To Show Its Full Color Transparent LED Film This Week At Infocomm

North American pros will get a first look this week at Infocomm at the transparent color LED film that LG first showed a few months ago at ISE in Amsterdam.

The film is touted as a way to turn any window or glass surface into a customizable digital canvas. If you were at Infocomm a year ago in Orlando, and wandered into LG Land, you would have seen gray-scale transparent LED films. A year on, they have color, which makes it more interesting.

Says LG: The versatile color LED film offers more than 1,000 nits of brightness, with each 668×480 mm panel containing 560 LED pixels that support a wide range of color while maintaining a high transparency ratio that displays compelling content in vivid colors while still showcasing what’s behind the glass.

“The LG Transparent Color LED film display exemplifies how LG continues to move the digital signage industry forward by offering unparalleled impact and versatility,” says Clark Brown, Vice President, Digital Signage, for LG US. “Next-generation display solutions like this blend seamlessly into surrounding environments for a limitless range of installation possibilities.”

The film is just 1.5mm thin, which for you metric-impaired people, about the thickness of a US penny.

The LEDs have a 24mm pixel pitch display – which means this is tech intended for ambient visuals and not for delivering important information. At that pitch, text would look from about 200 feet back. This (below) is what I shot at ISE. I love the tech, but it really is meant fo distance viewing when your eye can’t resolve the individual pixels.

It is, says LG, easy to install (requiring minimal construction) on any existing glass surface using its self-adhesive transparent film. While maintaining high transparency, the LED film can display pictures, animation and videos with various color combinations, making it ideal for indoor and window-facing areas with large glass surfaces such as retail storefront windows.

Other applications include mass transit rail platforms and safety barriers, where LG Transparent Color LED film can display digital content and information, and lobbies and large public areas where it can convert ordinary glass into stunning, eye-catching digital signage displays. Even tall glass elevator shafts can be transformed into stunning pillars of graphics and light. The flexible display also works on a wide range of curved glass and window surfaces with curved format support up to 1,100R concave and in parallel to the bezel, can be cut to size, truly converting any area of ordinary glass into a dazzling, state-of-the-art digital display.

LG is at Booth #2546 at the LVCC this week.

I am heading down to the blast furnace in the morning, flying the hell-tube that’s also known as Air Canada Rouge. Why a country’s national carrier has deemed Vegas a discount vacation route – when 80% of the people wedged in that old beater of a plane will be business travellers – completely escapes me.  Regular Air Canada is fine, but you can’t get to Vegas on regular Air Canada anymore. Rouge is awful. My feelings are not unique.

Waaaaa.

End of rant.

Dave Haynes

Dave Haynes

Editor/Founder at Sixteen:Nine
Dave Haynes is the founder and editor of Sixteen:Nine, an online publication that has followed the digital signage industry for more than a decade. Dave does strategic advisory consulting work for many end-users and vendors, and also writes for many of them. He's based near Toronto.
Dave Haynes

@sixteennine

12+ year-old blog and podcast about digital signage & related tech, written by industry consultant, analyst & bullshit filter Dave Haynes.
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