And Now There Are Digital Signage Pokémon Templates

Pokemon-template-1

The whole Pokémon Go thing escapes me, but I’m guessing there are countless baby boomers who aren’t quite seeing the thrill of running around catching imaginary cartoon characters on a phone.

But we’re not the market, and it’s clearly taken off among a younger crowd.

Mark McDermott from Screen.Cloud provided a useful post this morning that explained the digital signage ties, and I later remembered I’d also seen a marketing email from Rise Vision about a set of Pokémon Go content templates network operators can get off its store.

The first is a Watch Out! template that can be used to warn players to be careful in and around your space. You may recall the NYC transit system is running warnings aimed at distracted, obsessed players.

The second Poké Stop Discount is a promo template that can be used to attract avid Pokémon players into businesses. Like me, you’ve no doubt seen local news stories about coffee shops and c-stores seeing piles of people coming in.

Rise explains (mostly in way that escapes me entirely):

The template reads “Poké Stop Here” and offers a discount to anyone on the Valor team. Poké Stops are real-life locations that players will visit to collect items such as Poké Balls, which will make them more successful in the game. These Poké Stops are all over the place and are often filled with people.

Use this to your advantage and set up a deal for players who can prove they are on a specific team. Vector images for each Pokémon team can be found in the template beneath the Valor Team logo. Customize the team you want to show by replacing Team Valor with Team Mystic or Team Instinct. With this template, your business is bound to get noticed.

Ummm, well … OK.

Rise also has a Pokéball Animated Background, and don’t ask me what the heck that is.

The templates are free for Rise users, and as you probably know, the platform is free. They make money off the templates via customizations.

Maybe this is a fad, maybe it’s the future. Dunno. But if you run networks, manage them for clients, or sell services, there’s enough going on that getting a little more conversant in the business opportunity and mechanics of Pokémon Go probably makes some sense.

 

Dave Haynes

Dave Haynes

Editor/Founder at Sixteen:Nine
Dave Haynes is the founder and editor of Sixteen:Nine, an online publication that has followed the digital signage industry for more than a decade. Dave does strategic advisory consulting work for many end-users and vendors, and also writes for many of them. He's based near Toronto.
Dave Haynes

@sixteennine

Decade-old blog about digital signage and related tech, written by industry consultant and shit-disturber Dave Haynes.
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Dave Haynes

2 Comments

  • Brad Parler says:

    Neat to see the DS space catch up to the cultural phenom that is Pokemon Go, yeah – I’m a player, but I’ve seen the impact it’s taken across an entire spectrum of players of all ages, genders, social / economic backgrounds.

    Time will tell just how much of a fad this will be, but for a game that is posting record earnings, the best part of this is how polarizing it has become – people know what it is, and because it is generating foot traffic the smart play is to get in front of it and take advantage while you can!

    #TeamValorForLife 🙂

  • When the app first dropped, the first thing I did was call up clients in the leisure/tourism industry and tell them to get on it. Making lists of recently caught Pokemon on the facilities trails and grounds, advertising discounts for concessions near PokeStops, etc. That said, I would advise network owners to tread carefully went creating content. Nintendo aggressively protect their property in digital spaces.

    It was a great success when partnered with their social media marketing teams and kids brought along their parents to tour the spaces — and buy concessions of course.

    I’ve waited with baited breath for the first AR “killer” app. This isn’t it, but it’s brought AR back into the public’s eye ready for the next strike.

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