Cineplex Adds Digital Hoarding To Shopping Malls

Markville Mall - Digital Hoarding

Cineplex Digital Solutions has launched a new experiential Digital OOH product in Canadian shopping centres that it suggests is a better way to mask vacant storefronts in malls and other retail environments.

Cineplex says its plug and play experiential video wall set-up, called Digital Hoarding, “turns a blank space into an engaging and interactive experience that gets guests excited about what’s to come through customized content and gamification.”

Says a press release:

The Digital Hoarding features large touch and gesture-enabled screens that can be fully customized, allowing shopping centres, retailers and brands the opportunity to connect digitally with guests like never before. In addition to interactive screens, Digital Hoarding solutions also have photo capture capabilities, on-screen content manipulation technologies, couponing and gamification, social media connectivity and participant data capturing.

“Digital Hoarding is really about creating guest experiences and deriving value from a space in a retail environment that used to be off-limits to shoppers,” said Fab Stanghieri, General Manager, Cineplex Digital Media. “Digital interactive and engaging experiences are growing in popularity with shopping centres because they’re effective, affordable, reusable and fully-customizable – and the data shows that visitors love them.”

CF Markville in Markham, Ontario is the first shopping centre in Canada to utilize CDS’ exciting new Digital Hoarding solution. Its deployment includes two interactive screens deployed across the mall to drive guests to the Express Eatery via mobile couponing. Once there, digital hoarding provides activities and games designed to increase dwell time in the mall’s food court as well as provide a digital entertainment experience for its guests.

Digital Hoarding has a 98” landscape screen that delivers two customized interactive experiences that have been optimized to provide consumer insight analytics.

These experiences include:

  • Top Shopper – A fun and fast paced game that involves product icons falling on-screen. Visitors must add the icons to their shopping bag while avoiding obstacles.
  • Match by Memory – A two-minute memory challenge that has visitors use the touch screen to flip over as many matching customized cards as possible before the clock runs out. Match by Memory cards have been customized to the logos of the participating tenants located in the Express Eatery.

Both experiences are equipped with a leader board to entice guests to return to the Express Eatery to play for the highest score.

This looks very much like a riff on the virtual paparazzi experiential video wall Cineplex set up at a Toronto theatre last year, which makes sense. Same structure and tech, just different approaches.

I think of hoarding at malls as the plywood that goes up in front of a mall store when it is being built up inside by a new tenant, and not so much as a standalone wall in front of store hoarding, but that’s a big whatever, I suppose.

Does this sort of thing work? I dunno … analytics will tell that story. It certainly makes more sense than the similar experiential walls I see in airport corridors and mass transit hubs (which when I see them tend to have unsponsored, placeholder games up). People zoom right past those puppies.

Dave Haynes

Dave Haynes

Editor/Founder at Sixteen:Nine
Dave Haynes is the founder and editor of Sixteen:Nine, an online publication that has followed the digital signage industry for more than a decade. Dave does strategic advisory consulting work for many end-users and vendors, and also writes for many of them. He's based near Toronto.
Dave Haynes

@sixteennine

Decade-old blog about digital signage and related tech, written by industry consultant and shit-disturber Dave Haynes.
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