Buh-Bye Flash – IAB Says HTML5 Is The Way Forward

Via AD Age

HTML5_Logo_512Those software and creative guys doggedly hanging on to Adobe Flash as its main motion graphics playback tool might want to pay attention to the point of view of the Interactive Advertising Bureau, which is making HTML5 the new standard for digital creative.

The IAB is the organization that tries to enforce some order on what would otherwise by a wild west of differing ad formats across the web, mobile and, to some extend, digital OOH. The IAB’s charge is to lay down guidelines that make it possible to build one or a small family of ads in different shapes that can be booked and applied pretty much anywhere, and on anything.

The IAB says HTML5 is the way forward.

Adobe has been sufficiently wise to evolve its product, and instead of hanging on to Flash, Ad Age reports that the company “supported the move and helped update the voluntary guidelines – which are intended to create a unified and scalable digital advertising industry – along with other members like AOL, Google and Yahoo.”

“Markets take time to migrate and I think a company like Adobe, who have held the previous de facto market standards, have redefined themselves,” Scott Cunningham, general manager of the IAB Tech Lab, told Ad Age. “Adobe’s software suite already has support for HTML5 … You also have different companies that have emerged with a different de facto standard, but I think Adobe has positioned itself very well, especially at the IAB Tech Lab.”

The switch to HTML5 should occur within the next nine to 12 months, but for now, the IAB Display Creative Guidelines will be open for public comment until Sept. 18, 2015, allowing those in the industry to chime in about what they think should be tweaked or changed, Mr. Cunningham said.

Adobe Senior Product Manager Sarah Hunt said HTML5 will provide “an exciting new playground for ad publishers to distribute content.”

“Updating the IAB Display Creative Guidelines is only the first step in the process of helping the industry transition into an HTML5 dominant landscape,” said Hunt, who also co-chairs on the IAB HTML5 for digital advertising guidance working group. “Expert advice and guidance is going to be necessary in order to allow HTML5 to live up to its promise of delivering rich, immersive digital advertising creative that is cost-effective and looks great on both desktop and mobile screens.”

Flash software is used to make and display interactive online ads. While it has been the unofficial standard for years, its security vulnerabilities have been widely criticized.

The marketplace maturation of HTML5 is great news for a lot of software and creative firms working in digital signage. Just like online, there are a LOT of screen formats out there – full screen and the dreaded zones. HTML5, done well, is “responsive” enough to dynamically adjust and look good across many formats.

It’s also lighter and can play off the new breed of system on chip “smart” displays, as well as Android players.

A spreadsheet with the guidelines can be found here …

 

Dave Haynes

Dave Haynes

Editor/Founder at Sixteen:Nine
Dave Haynes is the founder and editor of Sixteen:Nine, an online publication that has followed the digital signage industry for more than a decade. Dave does strategic advisory consulting work for many end-users and vendors, and also writes for many of them. He's based near Toronto.
Dave Haynes

@sixteennine

Decade-old blog about digital signage and related tech, written by industry consultant and shit-disturber Dave Haynes.
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1 Comment

  • John Wang says:

    Completely agree. IAdea had been driving HTML5 as the content standard for digital signage since the POPAI days, and later with W3C on its Web-based Signage business group. Glad to see the effort coming to fruition.

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