Intel’s Compute Stick Gets Big Shoulder Shrug In Lab Testing

compute-stick

The geeks at Engadget have put put one of Intel’s new Compute Sticks through testing, and come back with a resounding shoulder shrug.

“The Compute Stick,” concludes the review, “shows that Intel can build an entirely new form of computing device, but it fails to prove why anyone would want one.”

The technical testing put the unit – basically a micro PC on an HDMI stick – on the level with netbook laptops – OK for a little light browsing and email. It also showed the units “managed to play” 1080P video files and stream YouTube.

The stick was debuted in January and quickly got some digital signage people thinking, “Hmmm …” The attraction was a $149 device that could run  Windows, whereas other sticks like this needed to run Android, which for some companies meant a concentrated development effort and resources.

Dave Haynes

Dave Haynes

Editor/Founder at Sixteen:Nine
Dave Haynes is the founder and editor of Sixteen:Nine, an online publication that has followed the digital signage industry for more than a decade. Dave does strategic advisory consulting work for many end-users and vendors, and also writes for many of them. He's based near Toronto.
Dave Haynes

@sixteennine

Decade-old blog about digital signage and related tech, written by industry consultant and shit-disturber Dave Haynes.
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1 Comment

  • Ken Goldberg says:

    Dave:

    No doubt the form factor and price are attractive, especially since it uses Intel chips, which can support a variety of OS choices, at least in theory. The real magic on these type of devices will come when 1) there is robust Linux support; and 2) they prove that it can reliably operate 24/7. The initial plans that Intel made public included Linux support on a ComputeStick with lesser specifications than the Windows version. I don’t know whether the well-specified version can be re-imaged or not. The reliability factor is really important for most DS networks. Early versions we tested from China documented that attempting to run it for more than a day or two straight was not a good idea. People in the know stateside simply shrugged when asked if it would run 24/7 without a hitch.

    Like most people, we look forward to the day when Intel-based devices can compete in the price range of equivalent ARM/Android devices. Whether it is this form factor or another makes little difference, but it seems the jury is still out on ComputeStick.

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